I have tried to pick my teams several times but it does not save them. please help

AT 75 YEARS YOUNG, MY FATHER JUST SENT THIS TO ME VIA TEXT MESSAGE. SINCE I COULDN'T FIND A WAY FOR THE WORLD TO READ, I THOUGHT I WOULD SHARE IT WITH YOU... BEST REGARDS AND LOVE TO THIS ONE GUYS. A TRUE MASTERPIECE. I'LL GIVE MY LIFE SAVINGS TO ONE WHO DOESN'T LIKE THIS!.............

Well, dear, another (sinking feeling!) tough GS loss for Federer. Too bad.

From what I can gather, he seemed a bit behind the power curve from the outset.

To be sure, he's only human. So we can say it's entirely understandable he might have been less than 100%. Not only was this late in the tournament, he'd just come off a tough 5-setter w/ JWT (Murray, by contrast, had not had such a grueling preliminary).

But as you & I have discussed multiple times over the past several years, Fed, despite glorious skills & grace on the court, has a grievous tendency to squander energy. This is problematic in itself. As time ticks away, the problem can only become more impactful.

The greater issue is this (a matter of straightforward human math): Let's say we commence a certain endeavor w/ a total energy package of 100 TEU (total energy units).

If we squander 5 EU (energy units), the percentage of wasted units (5 is what percent of 100) is 5%.

However, if, later on ((e.g., as the aging process inexorably marches forward) there are only 95 TEU available @ outset, what happens if we waste the same 5 EU?

Well, the same (basic human) math applies - I.e., 5 is what percent of 95, & the answer is 5.3 percent.

As time further moves forward, we may only have 90 TEU to bring to battle. So this time if we squander 5EU, we've wasted (5 divided by 90) 5.6 percent of our total energy.

And so it goes. The sequence is absolutely predictable.

And because of the absolute predictability, the assumption tends automatically to emerge that nothing whatsoever can be done about it.

Not so!

The key lies in minimizing waste.

I'm hopeful Fed will learn - 1st of all - that there is waste, &, 2nd, that something surely can be done about it.

His service game represents a highly significant area for waste reduction.

Everyone who's played tennis awhile knows that missing a 1st serve is wasteful. Not very many recognize, though, how wasteful it is.

Missing a 1st serve isn't a simple loss. Nor is it just lose-lose. It is lose-lose-lose-lose-lose. A prime offensive opportunity is lost; a serious chunk of energy is lost; a tactical advantage is lost; a momentum-gaining window is lost; & a discrete piece of the game is lost.

Well, yes, few recognize the extent of the loss. Still fewer pause to figure out what the problem is. Even fewer analyze the matter w/ sufficient care to build a good, evidence-based
strategy for improvement.

Unfortunately, just going out & 'hitting serves' isn't enough.

The important starting point is clarifying where & when glitches manifest themselves. Also important (make that vital) is taking a long look @ efficaciousness.

Of course, just having a high 1st serve percentage is next to meaningless. (If the 1st serve is a patty cake for an opponent's putaway, we're right back in the multiple-loss position. Aces are best. Short of that, though, the cornerstone issue lies in consistently gaining sufficient advantage w/ the 1st serve to win the point.)

Necessary areas to explore in the business of serve analysis include such things as,

- Day vs night;
- Hot weather vs cold;
- Windy vs not;
- Indoors vs outdoors;
- Grass vs clay vs whatever;
- After 8 hours sleep vs whatever;
- After 2 full days between matches
vs whatever;
- Into add court vs deuce court;
- Out wide vs down the T vs
whatever;
- Early in set/match vs later;
- At certain points vs others;
- Against lefties vs righties;
- Flat serve vs kicker vs whatever;
- Looking into sun/lights or no;
- Crowd noise or not;
- One particular venue vs another;
- and so forth.

Now, when looking @ anything in detail like this, a fairly typical response is that 'It's not worth the effort.' And if this is the attitude one chooses to have, well, then, that's the attitude that'll govern.

However, an equally valid (& far more productive) attitude is to approach the matter w/ a sense of worthwhile adventure - in anticipation of results that cannot be guaranteed, but which will almost certainly fall in the category of sustained, incremental improvement.

(The pithy ('take home') points of all this merely are,

1) Know thyself (the Ancient Greek
maxim is timeless);

2) Good practice together w/ good
scholarship are no more
necessary for preserving
excellence than brushing &
flossing are necessary for
preserving teeth.

3) Yes, the task is daunting. But
diligence in addressing any part
of it cannot but yield a measure
of benefit (an approach which, in
it's essence, goes to the very
heart of the definition of
professionalism).)

It seems to me that Federer is near a career & life crossroad. As I see it (based on irrefutable mathematical principles), he'll either steadfastly pursue ways to avoid squandering energy (thereby extending his magnificent career well into the years ahead), or, in a mental state of increasing perplexity, spiral down & out.

I might add, too, that Fed would stand to greatly benefit from a period of counseling & instruction from the great (&, @ age 79, still active) Ken Rosewall. Not a towering or muscular specimen (5'7" tall, & slender of build), he learned to maximize timing, change of pace, & placement to lift himself to the ranking of world #1, & into the elite handful of players recognized the world over as among the best in history.

(As but one isolated example, Federer's employment of the 'drive' ('swinging') volley represents (as you & I have discussed) a wildly wasteful expenditure of energy. A much more conservative stroke would accomplish the same, w/greater reliability. (He may enjoy using that 'drive' volley, &, yes, it's colorful to some extent to behold (when successful). But it's also an energy-squandering overkill, & terrible to behold when (as regularly happens) fluffed.)

Summary

In my humble opinion, we're all privileged to see this great champion play. He is most definitely one of the greatest players I've ever had the pleasure of seeing, & arguably the finest player in the history of tennis. Moreover, he's a gentleman & sportsman of the highest order (courteous & respectful toward all), &, all & all, one of the finest ambassadors of international goodwill I've ever witnessed).

The only concern (well, I should say, my only concern) is that as a mortal human being, energy conservation necessarily becomes, for him as a world- class competitor, a matter of ever increasing relevance. He either learns & adapts ways to avoid squandering energy, or (quite passively, & surely unhappily) becomes the unwitting steward of his own (unduly premature) decline.

When you next communicate w/ Roger, won't you please review these various matters w/ him.

Hope all's well!

Military Captain and Doctor did a bad job, And my scholarship for College was not earned, and my Psychology degree was paid for. Oh and my coaching certificates are just fake. do you think you are like a Tennis God and my Post threatened your vast Tennis knowlege? I think you are threatened by me

I can't believe some of the tennis minds in this group I know put up with you! Especially those I know are gentlemen. I posted some info for the thought of you. What an asshole...... WOW guy. Have you ever grown up, had a happy life, a child, a fine woman? I DOUBT IT SERIOUSLY! With that attitude you are VERY LONELY. I never break racquets EVER on court, I have heard privately from NUMEROUS persons in this group via personal email, and my feelings are that you are an odd ball. And one who targets people here. Well buddy, I don't do social media, but I do enjoy stuff face to face. Maybe we can hit some balls and I can see really how much your mouth can back up your manhood. Then I'll let my wife bust your ass. I don't think you could handle my 3 year old.

My goodness we have a PRIZE FIGHT tomorrow! Oh the Joys of tennis! Now I just HOPE backhandpass comes and plays doubles with me at the Turkey Day Invitational in November!!! We can play 9.0 or 9.5 and Singles to boot. I can find you a mixed partner too! Poco and I are in the 9.5 mixed. Lets go BHP!

The tennis gods have blessed us with this final!

Federer Murray is a definite possibilty. As much as I HATE to say it, If Dork is firing on all cylinders like he was today, Fed will indeed have his hands full. i could see Federer beat Dork, And give Murray a Trophy here though. Alas England needs this badly. I do see though Sneaky Serena plowing through to a win here. As long as she finds her range these other girls are, well, just not in the same league. Serena finds that one-two combo punch that even the men's game would have trouble with. As long as she can put together the one-two punch consistently, no women in the game can do much with it. The other girls hit less hard, but more consistently. However consistency means nothin when one has no chance to implement it. All I can say is Godspeeed to anyone or anything that comes up against a clicking Serena. If she is only firing on one cylinder, well, a much different outcome. If we had a Henin or Graf in the picture, just like Federer one can counter punch then attack, counter then attack, however mostly in the game we have girls that can attack, yet more or less hesitant to do so. Too Much screeching, over powering decibal squeeling, and really just a mute button performance. Congrats so far to the leaders, i.e., Scot, Tono, Backhand and Sneaky! A valiant job so far and I cannot wait to see what you guys pick for your prizes! So far Scot and BHP are in the hunt for the 40& tennis warehouse prize! And close races for the womes's and men's alone 25$ Great job gents! I can't wait for the hopefully rain free tennis tomorrow

When it rains at Wimbledon, the sadness emits itself. It makes the rest of the day feel like dust sitting on a shelf. Sitting there waiting to be wiped away, it is back to just more bills to pay. Federer finished his match so therefore I am somewhat complete, knowing that this may be his 7th Wimbledon is his ultimate feat. Ivanovic lost but she is still very elegant, to me,  her looks are to say the least, seemingly heaven sent. If I could turn back the hands of time, I would train harder at tennis whether rain or shine. Wimbledon, Australia, France or the US, all of the slams are a taste of the best. What if we did not have the blessing to watch the game? I would get so bored I would probably forget my name. Tennis balls zoom from the duece court to add, I shall teach this game to all the young lads. The future is brighter when holding at tennis racquet, wow I think I could have done better on this bracket! Iut backwards I cannot go, so I will not try. If I dont win a bracket soon I will fall down and cry. The US Open is next on the list, tennis is like poetry, I guess you catch my drift. So After reading this last part, cheer up and read it again from the start. The game of tennis is implanted in my heart :-)

9

(14 replies, posted in Wimbledon)

When it rains at Wimbledon, the sadness emits itself. It makes the rest of the day feel like dust sitting on a shelf. Sitting there waiting to be wiped away, it is back to just more bills to pay. Federer finished his match so therefore I am somewhat complete, knowing that this may be his 7th Wimbledon is his ultimate feat. Ivanovic lost but she is still very elegant, to me,  her looks are to say the least, seemingly heaven sent. If I could turn back the hands of time, I would train harder at tennis whether rain or shine. Wimbledon, Australia, France or the US, all of the slams are a taste of the best. What if we did not have the blessing to watch the game? I would get so bored I would probably forget my name. Tennis balls zoom from the duece court to add, I shall teach this game to all the young lads. The future is brighter when holding at tennis racquet, wow I think I could have done better on this bracket! Iut backwards I cannot go, so I will not try. If I dont win a bracket soon I will fall down and cry. The US Open is next on the list, tennis is like poetry, I guess you catch my drift. So After reading this last part, cheer up and read it again from the start. The game of tennis is implanted in my heart :-)

Tennis is the cornerstone of humanity. The last of the deuling men and women that can come to a gladiator arena and depart the match with a sense of pride, dignity and accomplishment. Tennis for ages has been the standard for gentility for men and women, young and old, novice or advanced in which one can always find a way to share a sport, a game and a sense of comradery with all that are either on court or in the stands to see. One may walk through an airport, a grocery store, a shooping mall or a neighborhood park and can spot or detect a tennis player from a mile away or by the first few words of conversation. The wonderful thing about tenured or at least exposed to tennis players is that most of them have the sense of "shaking hands" at the net. After a battle in life, sport, relationships and so many other realms of life, the one who has been exposed to Tennis seems to have the edge, win or lose, by knowing that at the end of the event, one can approach there opponent no matter the outcome and concede the hostility or adrenaline by saying, "good match." As in life, the quality quote by Plato, "Be kind for all are fighting their own tough battles," is prodiminent in those that wish to consciously on subconciously succeed in dealing with the trials of life. Tis why I humbly feel that tennis in one form or another should be introduced to all children in some shape or form. The learning to stop play if a ball rolls onto the court from an opposing one, a lesson to respect one's health from injury and to respect other's property. The shaking hands at the net, a lesson that no matter the outcome we are all mortal and there is no point of carrying on any grudge or hostility. The tradion of walking off the court together, a lesson that we are to stand as one in any setting to show the rest of our peers that if gladiators can after battle walk away together, that maybe as human beings we indeed to share a lot in common. The practice of calling out the score before every point, a lesson that we all are still indeed human and we may forget the smallest things that if gets just slightly off a big argument may ensue. The calling of nice shot or tapping your string bed in appreciation of a passing shot that just passed you by. A lesson that even in defeat that someone or something tried very hard to put forth the effort and practice to make that happen, which is in of itself a work of art. With the complexity of society today and the endless new trends and the likes of new generations spawning as we speak, tennis seems to remain in theory as a constant. Something we can spot from a mile away, and walk towards with a smile and say, "Hello, my name is Justin, I see you are a fellow tennis player, where are you from?' And I can almost promise you that within a short period of time that you and this new friend will speak again and use tennis as a common ground to form a long lasting bond that will eternallly remain and expand one's sense of friendship and sportsmanship on a global level. may God bless Tennis

11

(11 replies, posted in Tennis Anyone?)

Tennis is the cornerstone of humanity. The last of the deuling men and women that can come to a gladiator arena and depart the match with a sense of pride, dignity and accomplishment. Tennis for ages has been the standard for gentility for men and women, young and old, novice or advanced in which one can always find a way to share a sport, a game and a sense of comradery with all that are either on court or in the stands to see. One may walk through an airport, a grocery store, a shooping mall or a neighborhood park and can spot or detect a tennis player from a mile away or by the first few words of conversation. The wonderful thing about tenured or at least exposed to tennis players is that most of them have the sense of "shaking hands" at the net. After a battle in life, sport, relationships and so many other realms of life, the one who has been exposed to Tennis seems to have the edge, win or lose, by knowing that at the end of the event, one can approach there opponent no matter the outcome and concede the hostility or adrenaline by saying, "good match." As in life, the quality quote by Plato, "Be kind for all are fighting their own tough battles," is prodiminent in those that wish to consciously on subconciously succeed in dealing with the trials of life. Tis why I humbly feel that tennis in one form or another should be introduced to all children in some shape or form. The learning to stop play if a ball rolls onto the court from an opposing one, a lesson to respect one's health from injury and to respect other's property. The shaking hands at the net, a lesson that no matter the outcome we are all mortal and there is no point of carrying on any grudge or hostility. The tradion of walking off the court together, a lesson that we are to stand as one in any setting to show the rest of our peers that if gladiators can after battle walk away together, that maybe as human beings we indeed to share a lot in common. The practice of calling out the score before every point, a lesson that we all are still indeed human and we may forget the smallest things that if gets just slightly off a big argument may ensue. The calling of nice shot or tapping your string bed in appreciation of a passing shot that just passed you by. A lesson that even in defeat that someone or something tried very hard to put forth the effort and practice to make that happen, which is in of itself a work of art. With the complexity of society today and the endless new trends and the likes of new generations spawning as we speak, tennis seems to remain in theory as a constant. Something we can spot from a mile away, and walk towards with a smile and say, "Hello, my name is Justin, I see you are a fellow tennis player, where are you from?' And I can almost promise you that within a short period of time that you and this new friend will speak again and use tennis as a common ground to form a long lasting bond that will eternallly remain and expand one's sense of friendship and sportsmanship on a global level. may God bless Tennis!

Pardon my potential dumb question, but I am lost on the money totals spoken of. How are the money winnings etc attained. What are they based on? Sounds like a fun game when I get to fifty:-) prizes to from me! Just like our ATP and WTA for players group. Who keeps track of it all and are there current prizes? Maybe I can do like $25 for each slam and like 15$ for ever other? Justin

13

(14 replies, posted in Wimbledon)

Thanks Tono! I admire your studious tennis dedication! I think it is to be commended!

14

(3 replies, posted in Male Players)

Well said Tono. I just got the chills though at the end of the match, as baghdatis and Murray walked off the court together. That was classy. On the other hand, would Murray have waited for Baghdatis if he had lost? I think so. Yes, Murray is a top Notch player, but the fact of the matter is, will he show up?? sad

15

(97 replies, posted in Wimbledon)

Exactly!  Love u bro!

16

(3 replies, posted in Male Players)

The future of Murray in my opinion in Terms of Tennis is getting dire. As all in the locker rooms for the most part are continously complaining about him complaining, making excuses etc. Today watching the 1st couple of sets vs. Baghdatis, I see him looking to his box and complaining about his shorts. I mean this has gotten out of hand. To win Majors, one has to be complete physically and mentally. And I mean COMPLETE. When I see this type of conduct, all I see is a player in need of a Sports Psychologist not a new coach. There is nothing wrong with needing a mental boost just like a athlete needing a gym session. If Andy does not jump in a mental gym, and I mean soon, the new generation of players will slide right on in. The likes of Henman in relation to Murray are to very close. Murray so much more in terms of chances, but poor England will divorce him soon from the hope hill and begin to hunt for their next hope. I hope somehow Murray finds a way to tweak his game mentally, as getting any more physically fit will not just hurt him more, it will set him up for MAJOR disappointment. Any Thoughts? Coach Davis

Tono, Have you heard of a junior/ girl by the name of Emily Fanning? From New Zealand? She is a rising junior.

I was hoping Roddick would hold on. Ferrer just was more consistent and kept plodding along.

I was hoping Roddick would hold on. Ferrer just was more consistent and kept plodding along.

The old, but upcoming Jedi has reappeared. Kind of like Brian Baker here. So I just came off a hypothetical 6 year break and am feeling very fresh. :-) So Sir dv2jus saying I'm warming up. LOL. Whats Up Tono? Backhand? Arvis? Poco says hello:-)

21

(97 replies, posted in Wimbledon)

Arvis, I think Federer will win and Serena. Well Only if Serena can stop Zheng! 6-5 3rd set! :-0 Hello Tono! Backhandpass :-)

This tournament has been a family tradition in my tennis family since before I was born. Thirty four years later it is still very much a factor in mine and my families. Numerous breakfast at home Wimbledons, and watching those that have come and gone over the years, and going out to coach or play afterwards discussing the current, past and the future of our game. We must always remember how special tennis is day in and day out, and how very lucky we are to have these slams to share with all. I find that all I bump into, as they get to know me, they end up tennis fans, maybe never before having watched or played the game. Maybe it is my goal in life just to share the game with others. Maybe my soon to be born daughter, Gabriela Cecilia Davis will be the next number one! I will most surely try! But if not, then my fellow wife Carla (Poco) and I will continue to enjoy the sharing of the game with others as we were raised to do, and to preserve the traditions of the game that for example we see here at Wimbledon. Wimbledon has a way of humbling down the game just a bit, just for two weeks we see the new school players humble down a bit and educate themselves on where their games came from. Thank you tennis, Thank you Wimbledon! Justin

Well done Arvis! You are correct, we need to get you into tennis commentary! VAMOS!